Research Remix

April 2, 2008

Citing monkeys?

Filed under: citations, LitNotes — Tags: , — Heather Piwowar @ 7:42 am

Does anyone remember reading a paper about the citation history of ape studies? If so, I’d love a pointer or any keyword-details you might remember. I haven’t been able to find it.

For those who are curious: from what I remember, the authors were investigating the what proportion of ape (or was it monkey) studies are truly necessary. They collected citation histories and discovered that a large proportion of studies had received no citations at all. This suggests that although such studies have to clear high hurdles to be approved, our mechanisms are insufficient and as a result we’re putting our cousins through unnecessary hardship.

Interesting to me on a number of levels. 1. It would be a helpful reference for the usage of citation histories. 2. We’ve been to the zoo recently with a gorilla-enthralled two year old.  The apes (and monkeys) act just like some people I know.  Any invasive research (or zookeeping…) had better be worth it.

July 12, 2007

Presentation on Citation Rate for Shared Data

Filed under: citations, conferences, opendata, publishingdata — Heather Piwowar @ 10:36 am

Whoosh… where has the time gone.

A few weeks ago, I attended and presented at the NLM Biomedical Informatics Trainee conference. My presentation was well-received, despite (or perhaps because of) the fact that it was the last one on the last day. The questions period was more of a “rah-rah” time, as it turned out, with several people jumping in to make more broad statements in support of open access and author addendums. Great stuff.

The talk was a quick 15-minute overview of this paper:

Piwowar HA, Day RS, Fridsma DB (2007) Sharing Detailed Research Data Is Associated with Increased Citation Rate. PLoS ONE 2(3):e308.
doi:10.1371/journal.pone.0000308

I’ve posted my slides at Nature Precedings; the PDF file is of the PowerPoint notes pages which contain the full-text of my talk.

Comments, questions, votes: I’d love to hear from you. Turning comments off on this post, so that any discussion can be undiluted at the Nature Precedings site (and/or at the full-text at PLoS ONE). Please note the CC licence; use this work as you will.

Other talks at the conference which I found relevant to my work included:

  • Sharing Personal Health Information within Social Networks – Meredith Skeels, University of Washington
  • Contextual Analysis of Variation and Quality in Human-Curated Gene Ontology Annotations – W. John MacMullen, University of North Carolina, Chapel Hill
  • A Study of Experimental Information Management in Biomedical Research – Nicholas Anderson, University of Washington
  • Sequential Search Result Refinement of the Medical Literature – Len Tanaka, University of Texas School of Health Information Sciences at Houston

oh, and Stanford in June is right up there with Paris in the springtime. Wow, beautiful!

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